“Relaxed and Refreshed, Prepared to Learn”: Experiences With Virtual Yoga Programming in the Academic Library

By Chelsea Humphries
Liaison & Collections Librarian
James A. Gibson Library
Brock University

Abstract

Wellness initiatives on academic campuses are growing, and they are increasingly important as mental health declines and mental health problems continue to be exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Academic libraries are the spaces in which wellness initiatives can be brought to the frontlines, meeting students in the spaces within which they study and conduct their research. As a liaison librarian and a yoga instructor, my goal has been to humanize the academic library space with yoga as a mindful movement practice supporting wellness initiatives on campus and the library’s strategic priority of supporting student success. Upon remotely starting my role as a liaison librarian during the COVID-19 pandemic, I started a virtual Library Yoga program intended to support students and the broader university community as they cope with the stresses of working remotely. I offered both synchronous and recorded yoga sessions during the fall and winter terms. To ascertain the impact and value of this program, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, I conducted a web survey among Library Yoga participants (n=14). Survey results indicate that the program reduced stress, fostered a sense of community, challenged library anxiety and misperceptions of the profession, and provided an opportunity for library outreach. It also fostered relationships among organizations on campus during a time when remote work has challenged our abilities to coalesce as a community. These investigations confirm that the library is more than its spaces and collections; it has the ability to set the tone for academic experience with its services, staff, and the community it brings together. Continue reading “Relaxed and Refreshed, Prepared to Learn”: Experiences With Virtual Yoga Programming in the Academic Library

Memes and the Art of Literacy Maintenance

By Beth Carpenter, User Services & Instruction Librarian
Transylvania University
and
Bria Sinnott, Arts & Communication Librarian
Towson University

Abstract

Memes are powerful social media tools, but also powerful information literacy artifacts. Through theory and practice, memes have an important place in how we understand the way our students are thinking, how we can envision the future of information literacy, and how we can have some fun in the process.

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“Just Like When I Was a Liaison”: Applying a Liaison Approach to Functional Library Models

By Kristin Hoffmann, Research and Scholarly Communication Librarian, University of Western Ontario
and
Emily Carlisle-Johnston, Research and Scholarly Communication Librarian, University of Western Ontario

Abstract

In this exploratory paper we consolidate themes discussed in literature to highlight three principles of liaison librarianship: building relationships, anticipating and meeting needs, and drawing on specialized expertise. These principles capture how liaison librarians approach their professional activities and together comprise what we define as a liaison approach. Through stories of our own work as scholarly communication librarians, we explore how a liaison approach can extend beyond subject liaison models to be relevant for librarians in functional roles. In sharing our stories, we prompt academic librarians in a variety of roles to consider how the perspective of a liaison approach might be helpful in their work. We offer this perspective, too, as a new lens through which librarians and library administrators may view organizational restructures, so as to address challenges that may be reproduced or replicated when a library moves from subject liaison model to functional model.

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Creating a Training Program Framework for Information and Reference Staff

By Tina Chan
Reference Services Program Manager and Humanities Librarian
MIT Libraries

It can be challenging for information and reference staff to learn and remember the resources and services available in their library to assist patrons. Information and reference staff receive training when they are new employees, but they need to update their skills as new resources and services become available. This article explores an information services training program that MIT Libraries implemented to support all library staff who provide any information and reference service.  It examines the goals for a library-wide information services training program, the steps taken to complete the project, future work for the training program, and concludes with recommendations for creating a staff training program framework.

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Three Projects to Motivate Reading: The Experience of the University Library of Ukraine

By Olena Skachenko (skachenko.nana@gmail.com)
Scientific Library, Kyiv National University of Culture and Arts, Kyiv, Ukraine
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3827-5985

The article considers the experience of the University Library of Ukraine to motivate reading in college students. The author describes three library created events that encouraged students to visit the library, to read, and communicate with others in the library space. The first two events, Library Motivators and Literary Valentines, were implemented online. Information was posted on the library website and on different social networks. The third event, Book and Library Predictions was a way for students to communicate in the library space. Events like these could be implemented in other libraries using various online services and social networks.

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