Experiments towards a Pedagogy of Creativity and Learning in the Library

by Amos Blanton, MA EdS.
Aarhus University

Abstract

This describes a case study of efforts to create the conditions for library educators to engage in a dialog between theory and practice intended to enable them to eventually develop a pedagogy of creativity and hands-on learning for the library. Over 14 months of biweekly meetings, 5 librarian educators led by the author studied constructionist learning theory and a method of doing practice based research from the pedagogy known as the Reggio Emilia approach, and ran two hands-on workshops for adults and children. Documentation from those workshops is included as well as an analysis of the challenges that became evident during the process. Implications for libraries as non-formal learning institutions are discussed.
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Microdosing Information Literacy: Embedding Information Literacy to Improve Research Skills

Alison Downey, Assistant Professor of LIbrary Science at Valparaiso University
Holly Cross, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Valparaiso University
Abbie Thompson, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Valparaiso University

Abstract

In the summer of 2022, a librarian and 2 psychology faculty at Valparaiso University, a small liberal arts college, created a hybrid embedded IL intervention for introductory psychology courses to cover a broad range of research skills while limiting alterations to the existing course schedule. This model supports the Association of College and Research Libraries’ (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education with extensive collaboration between librarians and subject faculty. The goal of this initiative was to develop a curriculum, covering multiple facets of IL, that could be integrated into any current introductory psychology class without significant alterations to class content while expanding beyond the traditional one-shot model, in addition to,increasing students’ IL proficiencies. The IL intervention included: a set of online micro lessons, a classroom activity addressing authority and evaluation of potential misinformation, and a scaffolded semester-long project on gathering, evaluating and disseminating psychological research. Though content creation and collaboration required more time and effort at the beginning of the initiative, the outcome can be used in future semesters with few modifications. At both the start and completion of the semester, the control courses, and the 2 embedded IL courses, were administered self-assessment surveys and objective, quantitative post-test of IL knowledge and skills. Results from the pilot semester indicated that students participating in the intervention felt more confident in their research abilities, understanding of IL, and comfort working with the psychology librarian. This article will review the intervention and curriculum that was developed, feedback from students, address pitfalls and hurdles of integrating IL, and share lessons learned on how this model can be integrated in introductory psychology courses at other universities.

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Harnessing Library of Things for Citizen Livelihood Sustenance in Nigeria: Role of Librarians’ Social Entrepreneurship

By Adebowale Jeremy Adetayo, Adeleke University, Ede, Osun State, Nigeria
and
Olateju Abayomi Adeleke, Lagos State University, Ojo, Lagos State, Nigeria

Abstract

Nigeria has been facing a severe economic crisis, which has led to a sharp increase in poverty rates. The rising cost of essential commodities has further compounded the problem, making it increasingly difficult for citizens to sustain their livelihoods. In light of these challenges, librarians can play a critical role in ensuring that citizens are better equipped to cope with these economic pressures by engaging in social entrepreneurship and harnessing the library of things. By adopting collection development practices that prioritize items of critical societal relevance, librarians can build a robust library of things that can be made available to citizens through purchases, donations, and gifts. Given their customer-focused training, librarians are well-positioned to play a key role in delivering these services and ensuring that citizens have access to the tools and resources they need to sustain their daily lives. The article argues that leveraging the library of things as a social enterprise is a profitable and effective strategy for supporting the daily lives of ordinary Nigerians. To achieve this goal, policies must be developed that encourage the development of library of things and seek government support to ensure its success and expansion. By doing so, librarians can contribute to building a more sustainable and equitable future for all Nigerians.

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Together in the Same (Zoom) Room: Building Campus Community Around First-Year Writing and Information Literacy Through a Collaborative Online Forum

By Carl Hess
First Year Experience Librarian
Assistant Professor
University of Memphis

Ashley Roach-Freiman
Library Instruction Curriculum Coordinator
Assistant Librarian
University of Memphis

Abstract

Collaboration between academic libraries and multiple academic and non-academic campus units can be complex—even when different units are all working to solve similar issues, such as supporting the first-year writer. Breaking down the silos inherent to higher education institutions is essential to providing students with the support they need. This paper describes how one academic library sought to improve connections with multiple campus units to support first-year student writing and research skills during the COVID-19 pandemic through an online roundtable designed to brainstorm relevant collaborative projects. The authors share details on the creation of the roundtable, how participants felt about the nature of the collaboration through a feedback survey, and ongoing progress on the projects that were developed as a result of the event.

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An Area Studies Pilot: Faculty Engagement, Public Space and Reference Service

By Charmaine Henriques
International Studies Librarian
Indiana University
Herman B Wells Library
Bloomington, Indiana

Introduction

Indiana University Bloomington (IUB) Libraries noticed a decrease in student (predominantly undergraduates) usage of its services and resources. This ongoing concern had been noted in the library literature and library panels/presentations. Administrators throughout the nation repeatedly surveyed students, put together focus groups and convened committees to discuss and find solutions to this phenomenon. These investigations unearthed recurring issues: students didn’t know how to navigate the
library or where and from who to get help. There was a segment of this population that either grew up without access to or did not make use of the library during primary and secondary school. For certain post secondary students, a college or university library will be the first library they ever encounter which can be an overwhelming experience, while to others that have already been enrolled for a few years the library is an unknown, unwelcoming place that they do not understand. Even so, where many saw a problem, a group of Area Studies librarians at IUB Libraries saw an opportunity.

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